Impact of Violence & Power on an HIV Behavioral Intervention for Female Meth Users in San Diego

Funded by NIDA grant K01 DA031593; PI: Jamila Stockman

This five-year NIDA-funded Mentored Scientist Career Development Award (K01) will provide training and research experiences in the field of mixed methods and HIV intervention research in drug-using populations. Objectives of the training are to develop knowledge in substance abuse and intervention research and skills in qualitative, mixed methods and advanced statistical techniques. The training will be supplemented with research that will employ a mixed methods study design to characterize the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual relationship power differentials on HIV risk among HIV-negative, heterosexual, female methamphetamine (meth) users enrolled in the intervention arm of an HIV behavioral intervention study. This HIV behavioral intervention is designed to reduce sexual risk behaviors, meth use, and depressive symptoms.

The specific aims for this research project are to:

  1. Assess the effect of recent IPV and sexual relationship power differentials on the sexual risk behaviors of HIV-negative heterosexual meth-using women enrolled in the intervention arm of an HIV behavioral intervention.
  2. Examine whether cognitive mediators (e.g., condom use self-efficacy and outcome expectancies) mediate the relationship between recent IPV and sexual relationship power and sexual risk behaviors.
  3. Qualitatively characterize how the context of IPV and sexual relationship power differentials affect the adoption of safer sex behaviors during and after participation in the HIV behavioral intervention.

The mixed methods study will utilize quantitative data from an ethnically diverse sample of 100 meth-using women enrolled in the intervention group of an HIV prevention intervention study and qualitative data, in the form of in-depth interviews, from a subsample of these women reporting IPV and varying sexual relationship power differentials (N=30). Findings from this study will be critical for the development of a theoretically grounded, mixed methods behavioral HIV prevention intervention that addresses gender-based issues (e.g., IPV, sexual relationship power differentials) among drug-using women in the context of female-initiated barrier methods and empowerment.